How to Resolve WordPress SSL Content Warnings

Have you just created your site and notice that you’re getting an SSL error in your browser? So did I and these are the steps I took to correct the problem. The plugin that I have used and had good results is the SSL Insecure Content Fixer plugin.

 

 “Parts of this page are not secure (such as images)”

Step 1

Once you have downloaded it, head over to the settings section and change the default setting.

Step 2

Head back to your homepage and hit the refresh button you should see the green lock showing your site is secure. (Images below for help)

When the plugin is installed the default setting is set to Simple, change it to Content to fix the issues on the front end.

 

 

Blog Post Schedule

Just thought I would do a quick post to lay out what my intended plan is for content on this site. With three kids and a full-time job (kids on their own is a full-time job), I am planning on posting new guides M-F and posting personal blogs on the weekends.

The guides during the week will be about WordPress, Hosting, Social Media, etc. This will be a good way to share my experiences that I have with WordPress and how I was able to solve any problem that I had.

Lastly the personal blog, well that’s an obvious one. It will be about the kids and me. For those interested, those will be located here. ?

How to disable a plugin from cPanel

I’ve been there, installed a plugin and then the worst happens. The white screen with an error code across the top. The admin area is always affected as well. Can’t login.

Solution?

Delete the plugin from the directories folder. Now, not everyone has a cPanel. It depends on your hosting provider.

cPanel

Because of how simple & easy it is to have a cPanel, I’ve only used hosting companies that use cPanels. A list of companies I have used can be found here.

 

Once you have logged in, head over to the File Manager (picture #1). Once that loads you will see a list of folders on the left-hand column.

Click on the folder called public_html (picture #2) and then click the folder called wp-content.

After you click wp-content the last step is to find the folder called plugins (picture #3).

Click that folder and locate the plugin that caused the issue.

I typically just rename it and add (broke) at the end of the name this also disables the plugin. Alternatively, you can just delete the plugin folder.

If you still need help, I am available.

 

How to disable a plugin from cPanel

I’ve been there, installed a plugin and then the worst happens. The white screen with an error code across the top. The admin area is always affected as well. Can’t login.

Solution?

Delete the plugin from the directories folder. Now, not everyone has a cPanel. It depends on your hosting provider.

cPanel

Because of how simple & easy it is to have a cPanel, I’ve only used hosting companies that use cPanels. A list of companies I have used can be found here.

 

Once you have logged in, head over to the File Manager (picture #1). Once that loads you will see a list of folders on the left-hand column.

Click on the folder called public_html (picture #2) and then click the folder called wp-content.

After you click wp-content the last step is to find the folder called plugins (picture #3).

Click that folder and locate the plugin that caused the issue.

I typically just rename it and add (broke) at the end of the name this also disables the plugin. Alternatively, you can just delete the plugin folder.

If you still need help, I am available.

 

My very first website

If not for Photoshop I would not have created my first website. All thanks to a great graphics teacher who taught a great class during my Junior year of high school. I am going to paraphrase but I’ve always remembered him saying that no matter what you have learned here (high school), Photoshop will be something that you will always use.

To this day it is something that I have never stopped using, I created my first site because of a photo I created (still have it somewhere) of Nixon giving the peace sign as he boards his plane. What did I Photoshop? Everyone’s faces in the photo with Simpsons characters.

So I created this amazing photo and wanted a way to share it. MySpace was on the way out and Facebook was still building up momentum but not used much. So I created BrainFreeze101, I couldn’t remember if it was .com or .net.

I remember the struggles of creating that site ? so painful. In the end, it really was something that was a stepping stone to what I enjoy doing now. ?

Do you offer SEO to your Clients?

Having been working with WordPress for almost ten years now I can’t even remember how many websites I have created or worked on. I did write about my very first website I created back in high school. Since then things have advanced so much. I am perfectly fine creating a site for someone, thanking them for working with me and then parting ways. The only exception to that is the people that want extend support, training or ongoing maintenance.

Serch Engine Optimization (SEO) is something that has crossed my mind as being a service to offer, but the fact that it is such a long-term service with sometimes questionable results has always kept me from pursuing it.

So My Question

Do you offer SEO services to your clients? If you do has it worked out? Do you have any tips for someone that would want to offer it? If you don’t offer it, why not?

 

How to clear the Facebook share cache

Facebook caches URLs that are shared via posts or private message. If you are noticing that a URL is showing outdated information you can clear the cache by visiting Facebooks Developer site.

Make sure you are signed into your account. Enter the URL into the Sharing Debugger field, and click Debug.

Once you entered the URL click the Scrape Again button next to the time

 

 

Add post categories in your menu

In order to display your post categories in your main menu, there are a couple steps that need to be done first.

Step 1.

Start by heading to your sites admin section typically www.example.com/wp-admin

Step 2.

Once you are logged in click the Posts section, followed by the Categories Section.

Step 3.

Once you are on the Categories page create all your categories there.

Step 4.

Once you have created all your categories you can create the menu

Step 5.

Head over to the Appearance tab and click menus.

Step 6.

Click the Categories section under the Custom Links tab. All the categories you have created will be shown.

Step 7.

Add all the categories you want to the menu and click Save Menu or Create Menu if it’s a new menu.

Step 8.

When creating a new post make sure to click the right category so the post shows up on your page.

 

When WordPress Permalinks 404

The 404/Not Found error message is one of the most hated screens on the Internet; it indicates that though you, the browser, were able to communicate with the server, the page you need was not delivered either because it was not found or because the server for some reason was configured to not fulfill the request (which is happening in some countries with pages containing illegal content).

The page you actually see is not generated by your computer; instead, it is a special page on the server you’ve tried to contact. Many websites create their own special 404 pages either for artistic reasons or because the site owner wants to put specific data, like contact or redirect information, on the page. In Apache, having your own special 404 page is as simple as modifying the .htaccess file. (The only caveat: the page must be larger than 512 bytes or IE will not display it.)

In most cases, the 404 error comes up when a page has been moved or deleted from a site. However, in the case of WordPress, an annoying bug can cause permalinks to point to the 404 page instead of the page you want to have it bring up.

How Do WordPress Permalinks Work?

Permalinks are permanent URLs generated to point to your individual weblog posts, categories, and weblog lists. Other bloggers will use a permalink to point to your post from their own articles, or you can send links to other people via a permalink. When they are linked to an individual post, the URL is supposed to be permanent, not dynamic (changing).

The three types of permalinks WordPress delivers are the Default (aka “Ugly”) form, mod rewrite (“Pretty”), and PATHINFO (“Almost Pretty”).

Default links are formatted according to the default settings of a new WordPress install and will work on all server environments. It looks like this: http://example.com/?p=N , N being a number. It is neither neat nor elegant, but it does the job. Pretty mod rewrite links look more like this: http://example.com/yyyy/mm/dd/post-name/ . These permalinks require Apache’s mod_rewrite module, and won’t work on other server types. PATHINFO permalinks look like this: http://example.com/index.php/yyyy/mm/dd/post-name/ , and will work on other server types besides Apache.

Because you’re going from a dynamic to a fixed environment with your permalinks, a variety of things can go wrong with them. For instance, if your server includes Frontpage Extensions, permalinks will not function at all without doing a manual fix. Without this fix, any changes to the permalinks section from the WordPress admin interface will corrupt the Frontpage server extensions because it interferes with the .htaccess file.

Long permalinks can get chopped off as well, with only part of it working properly or with the entire link disabled. This will cause a 404 error to be generated but not because there’s something wrong with your permalink, rather because the title is too long. You can fix it by editing your .htaccess file to add a line:

RewriteRule ^post/([0-9]+)?/?([0-9]+)?/?$ /index.php?p=$1&page=$2 [QSA]

You can also make a habit of posting URLs with angle brackets () on either end. Most email and other problematic software won’t truncate URLs formatted this way.

Permalink Structure in WordPress

When your links don’t work, it’s often because you didn’t update your Permalink structure. Every time you add a new static page to your WordPress files, you must generate and update new rules to the .htaccess (which in newer versions is taken care of through the admin control area). If you don’t get a page returned at all, even a 404, and you use PHP 4.4 or 5 with Apache 2, you should look that up in the PHP bugs and issues pages. This is a specific known bug.

When you’re creating permalinks, another strange thing can happen: your WordPress blog must start the process of creating a permalink before it knows whether or not the page you’re creating one for actually exists. If it doesn’t, too late your link is already pointing at a 404 page. To repair this, you need to include a 404 direction in the header of your .htaccess file so that your rewrite conditions allow for a not-found error, and simply eliminate that page from your permalinks task. Try adding the following line above the WordPress rewrite rules, outside of #BEGIN WordPress[…]#END WordPress. Some plugins will overwrite this part if you edit the permalinks structure if it’s in the wrong place.

ErrorDocument 404/index.php?error=404?

Another solution is to use this following:

ErrorDocument 404/foo/index.php?error=404

foo = the directory you are using as a blog. The structure should be like this:

/foo/%category%/%postname%/

If you call a nonexistent directory, however, you’re still going to get that 404 permalink.

You can automate your permalinks tasks with several plugins, though. The Ultimate Tag Warrior (UTW) has gotten some good reviews, especially for search-engine sensitive pages. Google Sitemaps is a good plugin as well.

One more thing: if you use the xampp setup, your WordPress permalinks won’t work at all in the default installation…

The ultimate solution is actually to install WordPress 2.0.2; this new version has repaired the permalinks problem as well as a number of other problems.

Always double-check all your pages before you start working with permalinks, and after you’ve permalinked them. In some cases, you may have to delete all the permalinks and start over, but in most cases just taking a look at what you’re telling your server to do will prevent you from making a lot of stupid mistakes.

 

How To Set Up Your WP Blog

Set up your profile: First create your user profile and personal options. WordPress requires you to only give your contact email address and a nickname. Your e-mail address helps you to administer your blog. Only registered users will have access to your email so you will be notified when anyone adds comments to your post. You can add and update other optional information like your name, contact information and password as and when required. When you are setting up your user profile, set yourself as an administrator. If you intend to allow authors to contribute to your blog, add them and assign a role, giving suitable permissions.

Setting up Permalinks: The next is to set up permalinks which will give you good visibility in search results and visitors can get an idea about the link they are visiting. Goto Settings>Permalinks. From the options available in Common settings, select Custom structure. You can either use only the post title or include category and post title. Enter /%postname%(post title alone) or /%category%/%postname%(when URL includes category and title of the post). People otherwise suggest selecting the Day and name option to show up in search results and get more traffic.

Now you can add a few posts and get familiar with the how to manage your posts from the admin panel.

Configuring the security settings: A few security settings can make your WordPress secure against hackers and spamming activity. They are:

Admin account removal: When you installed WordPress, a default admin account is created. Remove the default admin account created at the time of WordPress installation to avoid hackers target your admin account. It is easy to delete your default admin account. Go to Users, hover your mouse over admin account and click Delete. Your admin account will be removed.

Turn-off remote publishing: If you are not using an external blog editor to post from a remote website or desktop blogging client clear the options Atom and XML-RPC publishing protocol found under Writing Settings.

Configuring the discussion settings: Discussion settings are related to your blog, article content and the authors.

Blog comments: There are about seven to eight settings that are relevant to blog comments and I recommend you to enable comments on your blog and maintain them as they enhance the value of the article. Make sure you get the email address and the name of the author who wants to add a comment on the article to avoid spam entries. You can also choose the close adding comments on your articles older than a particular number of days.

Approving blog comments: Let an e-mail alert tell you whenever anyone adds a comment on your article so that you are informed and can respond to the comments. You can have the authority to approve every comment on your article before it goes live. This is a good practice which will avoid spam and inappropriate content in your comment space.

Installing WordPress theme: Good blog content, as well as an attractive blog, go together for a successful blog. WordPress offers you free themes that you many install at any time easily or you can purchase a premium theme. Choose a theme that is compatible with the WordPress version you have installed. Theme installation is easy and you can find a host of themes in your WordPress dashboard. Navigate to Appearance>Themes. Theme installation requires you to upload the theme via FTP and activate the same.

Installing WordPress plugins: Add suitable plugins that will help you keep your WordPress blog secured, generate traffic to your blog find Article, upgrade your current installation version automatically and many others.

Hope your WordPress blog turns out successful.